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strong. like education, the ability of students to attend college, medical research and inthe noah vation, the about of -- ability of our older neighbors to live their lives in dignity in their retirement years through medicare and long-term care. now we get a lot of advice and economists across the board, in fact, our own congressional budget office, advise that the best and fastest way to reduce the deficit to is to make sure people across america have jobs and are working. it is inexplicable that the republican budget proposes to eliminate jobs in construction, in education, scientific research, and instead heaps the burden on middle class families. experts predict the republican budget will reresult in job losses of two million fewer jobs next year alone. that's on top of 750,000 jobs lost by the end of the year due to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close t
care reduction. no, no wants to do that. and no one wants to eat our seed corn. investment in education, investment in infrastructure, investment in sign b scientific research in order to keep narrow loopholes open, reductions if you move the business overseas. no, they don't want to debate that. but now we have a budget. because of the leadership of the chair of the budget committee and the members of her committee -- and, by the way, this is no -- this is not a small group of democrats. it runs from our most liberal members to our most conservative members, all united around the budget that is fiscally responsible. it meets the gramm-rudman -- i mean, i'm on old guy -- the simpson-bowles constraints, budget target. it invests in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he p
. some join right out of high school with the promise that they can further their education while in the military. this helps not only our troops but an educated military helps america. now the administration has broken another promise. thousands of troops can no longer go to college because the education program has been scuttled. for the sake of politics, the chicken little administration has handpicked programs to cut that would make americans feel the sequester the most. one of those programs is the military tuition assistance program. mr. speaker, tuition assistance for our military is not much money. the pentagon, the department of defense, has a budget of $700 billion. this little program is .1% of e $700 billion department of defense program. the tuition assistance program is great because it's one of the ways our government can take care of our men and women who help us. it's allowed members of the military to take 870,000 courses and graduate 50,000 individuals from many degrees. that is remarkable. but the program is gone thus sayeth the white house. the over the past f
that the economic philosophy of republicans has caused a massive amount of wealth for everyone. and education is ripe if reform and republican principles are perfect for minority voters. >> should i let you weigh in? >> i'm sorry. >> why are you laughing? >> you're laughing at education. expound upon your laughter on education. >> well, because its s's ridicus to try to think that the party who tried to get rid of the department of education is the one who wants to push education. it's ridiculous to think the tent that wanted to gut the teachers union want to push education. the party that wanted to take funding away from education is now the party in favor of education. that's reason i started laughing. >> those policieses worked well for you over the last 40 years. those schools that you're professing that teachers unions have a hold on on are doing really well. where school choice and charter schools that's what's doing well and voters across minority voters to voters of every ethnicity tick have seen the benefits of those kind of schools. >> by this argument, we can see how difficult the
so frequently face discrimination in everyday life. in all aspects of their life. from education, employment and health care, to all of their social relationships. as a result it's harder for them to stay healthy, to get health care insurance coverage, and to get the health care they need. here at cap we are leveraging implementation of the affordable care act help eliminate barriers that keep the and transgender people in the with hiv from achieving the highest animal health care needs, health care that they need. in particular, our lgbt stated change project is working in states across the country to support better data collection, better consumer protection, comprehensive and reliable insurance benefits, and a successful implementation of the medicaid expansion. when you look at the affordable care act, you know, those on the right complained that it is a bit of social engineering. and what it really is is trying to ensure that we cover all americans and provide them with good coverage. we should also look at the aca as an opportunity to expand basic rights for the lesbian, ga
-- lgbt community. the benefits and what is in play. outreach education and enrollment. you have to inform them of their choices and provide ways to help enroll new coverage where it is available. scaling of the workforce is how we can help with this. how will the care be monitored, and medicaid expansion decisions, health insurance exchanges and ultimately the future of ryan white. i will wrap up now and review of some of these thoughts with what the panel has to say. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, for that thoughtful overview. we are going to move now to our panel discussion. our moderator this morning is the advisor for lgbt policy and racial justice and director of the fire initiative that explores the impact of public policy on gay and transgender people of color. >> good morning, everyone. thank you for providing a great overview for us on how this benefits lgbt people and people living with hiv. includes the principles of universal design. some are marginalized among us and we are helping to work to get a system that works for everyone. we are we're going to talk about what we
a better education than you. and in fact, the reverse is happening. women entering the work force are often better educated, with more academic and trade certifications than men who are doing it. and women are also doing hard and dangerous jobs. we can look to what they do in the military. they can look at how we see them as firefighters and police officers and prison guards. under the legislative i am proposing, no longer will women be on their own and fighting for equal pay or for equal work. in this country, we say work hard and play by the rules, you'll get ahead. we work hard every day but we find that the rules are different for women and for men. actually, the rules in many workplaces are rigged against us. so, mr. president, i would hope that we would pass my amendment today that would allow us to be able to go forward later on in the year and pass paycheck fairness. it is important to the women in the workplace and it's important to our economy. much is being said here about being pro growth. who isn't pro growth? of course we want to grow our economy. and if we look at the tax str
billion in one year. we spend about $100 billion on education. we spend about $40 billion-plus, a little over, on highways, roads and bridges. that's just an example. we are now surging from 200, 250 in interest to 800 in interest as a result of the accounting that c.b.o. has provided us if we follow this path. it's going to crowd out spending for research. it's going to crowd out spending for children, education, health care and any other program this government wishes to undertake, including defense. mr. president, what kind of time limit might i inquire? is it 30 minutes on this side on this motion? the presiding officer: on the motion, there is one hour equally divided. would the senator like to call up his motion? mr. sessions: my first question would be how much time is left on my half of that hour? the presiding officer: the motion has not yet been called. mr. sessions: well, i would call up the motion, mr. president. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: the senator from alabama, mr. sessions, moves to recommit senate concurrent resolution 8 back to
to see better educated, but you understand that an effective member has to negotiate and has to compromise to come to some sort of final product. otherwise you will never get a final product. >> i agree with -- what is the biggest problem we face today that we are just stop gone? it is this fiscal crisis, the budget. families are looking at it and saying i have got to deal with this all the time, and you guys cannot deal with it. the biggest thing to me would be the leadership of congress to recognize that the budget aocess has to be utilized in way that gets this issue resolved, because if we go every three months with more in decision and 11th-hour -- making, thetizen frustration that people have to live their lives and cannot figure out the process, it will drive them nuts and treat the most negative phillies in the world. it is the responsibility of leadership to make this process work, and they have to act like leaders, like tom daschle did and some of the other folks. >> changing the rules might take the incentive structure, but ultimately is about the men and women who
confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr. sarbanes, for five minutes. mr. sarbanes: mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the 192nd anniversary of greek independence day. greece and america are history's most storied democracies. our founding
subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion for transportation needs and $10 billion for infrastructure -- for an infrastructure jobback -- bank. as federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has said many times over the past few years, simply pursuing deep cuts in the short-term will slow the rate of economic growth and bring down revenues and lead to less deficit reduction. we have two paths before us. we can choose a path of austerity and indifference that will limit economic growth and increase inequality or we can choose one of inspiration and inclusion that invests in our country and creates opportunities for everyone. i choose opportunity over austerity an
're losing, our children are actually being indoctrinated in the education system. this teacher's union, they are teaching our kids the liberal philosophy, and if we could infiltrate the educational system and the media, we would probably have a better chance. host: and how do you use that? what changes need to be made in order to do that? are you not happy with current conservative outlets that are out there? caller: i would actually pay for the education from some of these conserve tizz so they could get into the school system. host: carl from martinsville, west virginia, with another call there at home this morning. here's a story from the "usa today", a few other stories we wanted to point out to you. relatives kept on campaign payrolls. an investigation that "usa today" did, 32 members of congress dispensed more than $2 million in campaign funds to pay relatives' salaries during the 2012 election cycle, a "usa today" analysis at the most recent campaign record shows. law makers have hired their children, their spouses, aunts, parents, and in-laws as consultants, account acts and re
you wen education, weaker in defense, by laying people off in jobs, it makes you weaker because your unemployment rate is higher. it is like looking in the mirror and wishing your weaker. we have to be stronger. can we make cuts? sure we can and we have and we'll make more. but we ought to be focused on being stronger, about growing the economy and growing jobs. and that's why the approach that the senate takes is the right approach. because by utilizing revenues appropriately, reforming tax expenditures to reduce they will on the equivalent of% o 7% or 8a year, thee myriad of tax expenditures in the tax code were able to find cuts. the senate budget in achieving additional deficit reduction is a balanced approach that will make us stronger, not weaker, and that's why it is my great hope that we will pass this in a significant way. i thank the chairman. i thank you, madam president. mrs. murray: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i want to thank the senators virginia and hawaii for excellent statements and really laying out the framework
and opportunity. we want families that are strong, children that are well educated, we want to lift people up from poverty to put the american dream in reach for everybody. our party just can't hire our way forward. it must inspire our way forward. we will do a better job of connecting with people to our principles, showing how we can help every american climb the economic ladder. knowing parents want the best for their children, we'll champion school choice and solutions to lowering the costs of health care. instead of arithmetic, our focus should be on what helps families thrive. we don't want to fix the debt because a balanced budget looks nice, we want to do it because it will help keep money in people's pockets and create more jobs for those who have lost hope. the report minces no words in telling us that we have to be more inclusive. i agree. and as president reagan said, our 80% friend is not our 20% enemy. we can be true to our principles without being disrespectful to those who don't agree with 100% of them. finding common ground with voters will be our top priority. so, first, we're goi
guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation and infrastructure necessary to job creation and economic growth and protects the middle class from these large tax increases. the democratic alternative reduces the deficit in a fiscal and responsible way and a balanced way. without causing harm today and without threatening our economic competitiveness for the future and reduces the deficit while meeting our commitment to our seniors, our elderly and to our children. i urge my colleagues to reject the republican budget that threatens our seniors, our middle class and our economic growth and to vote for the democratic alternative that builds on our great strength as a nation. innovative entrepreneurial business sector, skilled rs hard-working middle class, vote for the democratic alternative that will builds on hope, security and opportunity for all americans. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: the gentlelady from pennsylvania said that ending medicare as we know it. i got news for you, obamacare ends medicare as we know it. it
for a fun and educational experience. since 1938 the derby has inspired thousands of the region's young people to learn the physics behind gravity racing and the engineering used to design soapbox racers. america's soapbox derby has been called the greatest amateur racing event in the world. and on june 15 it will continue to make history. the derby teaches sportsmanship, hard work and pride of accomplishment and it imbues its young participants with that same spirit of innovation that has long fueled america's greatness. young people who participate in these derbies are often sponsored by community groups, police departments, fire departments and others who want to invest in our country's future and a very direct and meaningful way -- in a very direct and meaningful way. every year i am incredibly proud of my constituents from maryland's fifth district who participate. a number of soapbox derby champions have come from the fifth district, including the 2009 s of the 2007, 2008, and last year. the winners in 2007 and 2008, kasey rader and courtney rail, respectively went on to win the
on the. another area where people are educated. it can make a difference just like educating people with regards to the deficits were facing and that deficit supposedly help the economy. before i get into this, we both taught at the university of chicago law school. the first time i met him i introduced myself and say you are the kind of guy. as idiotic as silk. and i had no he would help me out with the city of chicago since i'd heard that. they said maybe we can get together for lunch sometime. but he kind of wrinkled his face, turned his back to me and walked away and that was the end of our first conversation. i have to say rinne two and 20 other times and it's pretty much the way all our conversations went. it is not thinking i would be getting christmas cards or anything else from him. i was not as a retired part of it is that got the strong impression when i would run into him that he viewed me as evil because of the gun issue. he had very strong opinions on the. [inaudible] [laughter] i'd found something on the gun issue he disagreed very strongly about and he viewed me as e
were widely denied an education. now, more than eight million students attend afghan schools and more than 40% of them are female. in 2001 afghanistan had 20,000 teachers, all male. today there are 200,000 teachers including 60,000 women. the number of schools in afghanistan has grown from 3400 in 2001 to more than 16,000 today. per capita gdp has grown fourfold since 2001. afghan life expectancy has increased 20 years since then. more than 18 million afghans now have telephone access compared to about one million ten years ago. now these facts do not eliminate the difficulties that we face. they continue insurgency, a neighbor, pakistan that remains a safe haven for insurgents moving across the border. an ineffective and often corrupt central government and other major barriers to stability and to progress. just as it is important for us to be realistic about the challenges that we face in afghanistan, it's also important that we recognize the advances that have an bp made. so that we can reinforce actions that promote success. i just mentioned two here. the first is to continue to w
, in science and research, in education. things that are important to power the economy. our focus has been on jobs first. let's get the economy in full gear. not put the brakes on it. which is what the republicans do. they've gotten austerity budget that according to the nonpartisan congressional budget office, will result in 750,000 fewer jobs bn i end of the year. so we say let's tackle the deficit in a smart way, get people back to work and reduce it over a steady period over a period of time and our comes to balance at the same time that the republicans' budget from last year comes into balance. >> on the issue of revenue, i believe your budget has about $200 billion more in revenue than senator murray's budget in the senate. why did you put that in there considering that republicans are so adverse to any new revenue? >> the budget we have in our democratic proposal. if you take it even together with the revenue from the fiscal cliff agreement, is still less total revenue, luke, than was embedded in the bipartisan simpson-bowles agreement. so we have less revenue proposed by that bipar
think would probably help the city a lot more focusing on education and focusing in terms of economic development. you know, i just have to say -- >> of course his argument is this is critical of a critical public health issue and people who smoke cost millions if not billions of dollars a year. >> but again, sort of return on the time you're going to spend. given the fact that it's not like it is going to stop people from buying vigts. i mean, they can still walk in and purchase them. i just think it is an interesting use of his time and i have to say that i think the city would be better served if he focused on education as opposed to this. >> doug, the head of the new york association of convenience stores is not happy about this. here's what he had to say about it. we think it's patently absurd. can you think of any other retail business licensed to sell legal products that is required to hide them from the view of its customers? he right? >> well, i think that's because the tobacco industry spends about a billion dollars in direct marketing toward -- they make payments to these c
grandson, henry adams, remembered louisa catherine fondly. in his works, the education of the adams, he described louisa catherine and her role in this house and relationship with the family. he felt that she was the odd man out, because she was born in england and educated in france. she remained a foreign personality to many of the adams's. he recollects her sitting in her paneled room, using her silver tea pot that that she brought with her from her home in england to the old house. she would entertain both herself and many guest in this room. john quincy adams and louisa would inherit this home from john adams. i thought about selling it, but then decided that it was important to the family story to hold onto the house for future generations. >> you can visit there today. >> yes. >> wonderful. where the papers? >> they are at the massachusetts historical society in boston. they used to be at the old house would distill my very, but they were transferred to the historical society for safekeeping. >> a question on facebook from genie webber. i have read excerpts from her autobiography
in the republican party. withling to them educational choice and opportunity and small business. with the exception of nevada, the asian vote collapsed. now, michael targeting. e have heard from michael -- now, micro targeting. we have heard from michael barone. a friend of mine was handed an ipad and a clipboard before the election and was told, "this is the precinct you are going to walk." is onlysaid, "this four households." and they said, "that is ok. we have collins the messages -- , andve honed the messages we have decided that this is the script to appeal to those voters, and your job is to go out and get those, and nothing else. we will give you another precinct in the afternoon." she found them, and they were home, and she got the votes. that is micro targeting. ford, a former head of the council, he has said, of course, obama had a powerful message, but he was also able to find voters in places like colorado and florida that have not been found before, and we will have to emulate that if we want to have success. lastly, there is one thing we have to worry about. we are seeing an attempt t
? and for many, will my schools perform to the ability that my kids can get a great education? it's one of the thing that is' important to be relevant. you see, a couple years ago before i was governor there was a young woman named miss sampson in wisconsin in a community called milwaukee where the milwaukee public schools are some of the most challenged in the country. and this young woman was a first-year teacher who was named the outstanding teacher of the year. she got notice about that, and about a week, week and a half later she got a second notice. do you think what that was? she'd been laid off. you see, under my predecessor, they cut funding for education, but they didn't give them anything in return to make up for them, so what happened? when you have less money in those situations even though she was named one of the best teachers in the state in her profession, what happened to her? she was one of the first to be laid off. why? because under the old system of collective bargaining, one of the last hired is the first fired. one of the great things you may not know about in ou
education advisory board the leaders ofte these universities as to the occur at our can target their research facilities. i would say probably has gotten exacerbated in the realm of digital information and cyber attacks. you no longer have to rely on an individual becomes your asset to gather the secrets in the cyber arena. it is just as easy to have somebody familiar with a cyberworld sitting in shanghai are beijing where some place in russia to attack the networks and export the information. a third is more substantial than it was a tenor 15 years ago. substantial is more than it was 10 or 15 years ago. rote to youto -- w about security lapses at the nasa centers. i saw that the fbi and dhs were involved and in the apprehension of a credible individual being held. you have any comments about that case? think it is indicative of the threat he mentioned. the arrest occurred over the weekend and is now in of the court proceeding . happening at nasa langley and i saw your testimony last week's with regard to clapper with regard to china, ames or be happening at places?rd or other
and educational grants to train people how to be safe in using their guns, and also provide for an age level for young people not being able to have these guns. this is the way that america wants us to go. let us travel a pattern of saving jobs and preventing gun violence, intervening in the lives of those who need our protection. that's what this congress should be doing, providing the pathway for america's success. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition? mr. rogers: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that the speaker may postpone further proceedings on the motion to concur in the senate amendments to h.r. 933, as though under clause 8-a-1-a of rule 20. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. bjection is heard. objection is withdrawn. there is no objection, so ordered. the gentleman from contract seek recognition. mr. rogers: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r.
the insurance they need or the subsidies they need to get educated. she is trying to gain sympathies here for rich preppy white house staffers that need to pay $7 for a nice meal in the cafeteria in d.c. and now they want to raise it to $10. is that what i'm getting from her? >> clayton: she says the quality of the food. if you look at the quality of the food, even lowering it it's still better than the school lunches most of our kids get to eat across this country. >> alisyn: you mean mystery meat? [yuck] >> peter: what was that pink slime they had coming out of tube. >> clayton: we used to have cheese dream take hamburger bumps the enriched flour ones break it in half and drizzle cheese ton and melt it and that was lunch. >> alisyn: that sounds delicious. the food i had in my cafeteria completely indefinable. it was just a sort of. >> clayton: jell-o. >> alisyn: gentlemen -- gelatinous. i think it was a kung pow chicken thing. let us know what the most heart breaking sequester cut you have heard is find us on twitter. are you on twitter? the neys are 49. without objection. >> the senate
, but john did. >> she was born in england and educated in france and she remained a phone personality to many of the adams, but not to henry as a world traveler herself. she was very well educated, very sophisticated socially i would say. she sort of entertained john quincy's road to the white house. >> she was not happy about returning to washington as the wife of a congressman. >> louisa catherine adams essentially became the campaign manager for her husband, john quincy adams' run for the presidency in 1824 by dominating the capital city's social circuit. following a contested election, the adams' four years in the white house were a turbulent period in american politics and washington society. we'll look at louisa adams' relationship with her husband john quincy adams and john and abigail on the road to 1600 pennsylvania avenue. good evening and welcome to our continuing series on first ladies influence and image in partnership with the white house historical association. the next installment is on louisa catherine adams, the wife of john quincy adams. we have two guests at the ta
find something pretty big in the department of education. we'll tell what you is up there. >>> a manhunt is underway after a prison director is gunned down in cold blood in his own home. ♪ [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums martha: this is a possible big setback for gun control advocates. senate majority leader harry reid says that he is dropping the assault weapons ban part of this which is really what we've been talking about all along. dropping that from the senate's gun control package. i'm joined by senator scott brown who is not at all surprised by this action. the former u.s. senator and fox news contributor joins us now. senator, good to have you with us to america's newsroom. >> thank you very much. martha: a lot of people talked about the big talk on sought weapons ban and it was so important to be passed. now it is not in the bill and been deleted. >> he is particular harry
of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. looks like we bothave a lot of catching up to do. well, visit pbskidsgo.org, where you can play a lot of games for your favorite characters, and win votes, too. well, go ahead, what are you waiting for? guys, i've been training -- i'm sorry. this is totally a blooper. (laughing) marcus... (laughter) >>> this is "nightly business report." >> moving higher. stocks finish on an up note. still on track for the best quarter in 15 years. >>> water, water not everywhere. how the on going drought is hitting texas especially hard and how it may get worse. >>> and too late or not? why there is still time to refinance your mortgage but you may not want toait much longer. all that and more coming up right now. welcome to our viewing. >> investors were back in the buying mood as stocks bounced back but still closed lower for the week. the dow snapped the streak of four straight winning weeks and the s&p 500 logging the second losing week in 2013. the markets got a lift on optimism out of cyprus combined with a batch o stronger tha expec
's a situation that's out there. we will see what happens with the cases. >> jamie: businesses and educators are coming together to keep cash-strapped schools open. but not everyone's on board. critics i say kids are getting the short end of that deal. [ male announcer ] let's say you pay your guy around 2% to manage your money. that's not much, you think. except it's 2% every year. go to e-trade and find out how much our advice and guidance costs. spoiler alert: it's low. it's guidance on your terms, not ours. e-trade. less for us. more for you. with google now, it automatically knows when you need to leave for the airport, how much traffic there is, and can have your boarding pass ready. the droid razr maxx hd by motorola. droid-smart. droid-powerful. ♪ i want a weed free season, that's how i roll ♪ ♪ so i reach for roundup extended control ♪ ♪ with the all-new, no pump, one-touch wand ♪ ♪ it kills weeds dead and keeps weeds gone ♪ [ whip cracks ] ♪ roundup extended control ♪ i just spray them weeds, then spray them cracks ♪ ♪ the weeds are gone, and they won't be b
. are yourdren responsibility. here in texas we are having to educate $10,000 per child per , and anyway, it is just absolutely ridiculous. all of this is because our government have absolutely refused to close the border all of these years. the country is really getting fed up with it. size,wn in texas of any they have a real organized mexican gang. drugs are coming in. are smugglingw in middle easterners and from all over the world. anyway, the government has cut back on enforcement should not cost americans $160 per day to detain someone. detain them long enough to get a bus to take them back. anti-illegal how immigration groups in arizona met the news last month that people from immigration detention centers were being let go. one phoenix-based group stands with arizona. executive director says that affirmative homeland security was using immigration security as a political weapon. he wrote the shocking, lawless merely to score points on sequestration proved we have said all along, they are far too politicized to be trusted to implement a good deal, or the gang of eight's immigration
of various scenarios, how things can be handled. a few, what is happening? caller: i am in education, and we have civilians students and military in the same classes. of theworking options next go around of not having civilians in the classroom because they cannot be in there for five days a week. we are looking at all the different options, have to spend a lot of tried -- time. host: let's hear from another federal worker, a democrat in virginia. good morning, michael. say godi would like to bless america and c-span, and thank you for being here. i would like to say, the sequestration is going to have a big affect up and down the east coast, from here to texas, that firstpan into the early and second quarter of next year. work, psychologically, i see people slowing down. you know, inlike, a grip, waiting for some thing to happen. i have friends and other agencies, and other parts of virginia and places. i just see the intensity. cut ofu throw in the almost $10,000 for me, for 22 days, you add the payroll tax, i am looking at a setback of -- or a contraction of 13,000 dollars or $14,000 this
california company startups and the like. the underlining foundation of infrastructure, education, the existing businesses that are in california. all of that provides a solid foundation for economic growth and for businesses to stay in california. some leave, but actually over the last decade and a half, it has been very small percentages of the total employment in california, actually less than 1% of the total employment has left. there has been a decline, but that is from the general collapse of the economy causing a crisis in the economy. the real key to success is education, research, infrastructure, manufacturing of all kinds of things and change. cheryl: i am glad you're bringing up the answers because that is what i wanted to hear from you, what can i do to keep companies like apple and facebook. these are companies that are still headquartered in california but expanding in the state of texas. one thing we look at was the cost of doing business, to look at the national average, texas is well below the national average when it comes to doing business, cost o the cost of bu
,000 per child on public schools and they don't provide an education that allows people to move forward. we need to give parents choices on how to take some of their own money and go to private schools or parochial schools or home school, and give people those opportunities so the competition can provide a better education for people. i think you're quite right that the government has damaged the hopes and opportunities and the ability to move forward of millions of americans. they've got regulations that kill jobs. how many americans could be building the pipeline they wanted to bring down through nebraska, and the government spent four years delaying that. that's tens of thousands of jobs, people could have gotten the first job of their life, stopped by that. we need to do more exploration in alaska and other places. again, tens, hundreds of thousands of jobs. the champber of commerce estimates a million jobs killed by government enact. people need to be treated fair live with the government and that's not happening. >> coming up, congressman steve pierce of new mexico discusses the repub
third week. michigan's head start program could be next on the shopping block. nbc's chief education correspondent rehema ellis is joining me this afternoon from detroit and rehema, with a long distance hello to you, my friend, for many students in detroit there are problems with this education system which are now magnified by the statewide economic troubles. you kn i know you were talking about this issue with the governor. >> we were, and we're going to talk about it all with students when we have a town hall meeting here just a little while from now that everybody can watch online on education nation.com. but the governor says that they have no choice but to make some changes here because of the dire situation that they're in as far as their budget is concerned. the changes have been controversial. but when you think about it, just this one quick statistic, 27% of african-american students who are in the 11th grade and only 62% of white students in the 11th grade are reading at or above proficiency. and the governor says they have got to do better than that. just listen. >> if yo
so that the political change can actually stick. earlier, you were talking about brown v education. the fact that it didn't stick, we're avoiding that in the movement. we're telling the stories that stay in people's hearts so that when the laws are passed, they'll stick. >> it's interesting. i think we sometimes down play the cultural piece, but representative lee, you and i were talking in the makeup room that you were the first black cheerleader on your high school team. i'm clapping because i was a high school cheerleader. on one hand, you think what difference does it make if the cheerleading team is integrated? in fact, it does make a difference for us to be participating with one another in these so-called normative spaces in order to like generate that sense of familiarity. >> sure. it makes a big difference. because people have to identify. this is a diverse country, first of all. people have to identify on all fronts and when i went to high school, there were african-american, latino and asian pacific american students. but the criteria, you had to be blond and blue-eyed t
the fact that the democratic budget invests in people and when you invest in people an jobs and education -- ms. slaughter: i yield the gentlelady an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. jackson lee: when off preschool program, when you have programs that transition women out of their homes after raising children into jobs, when off program that allows young people with a college degree to get a job, when you have programs that invest in infrastructure and build highways and bridges that america is begging for, like we built the hoover dam, then our grandchildren and children will receive an america that we invested in, they'll receive a fwift and they'll be able to work with their hands and their minds and they will have the ability to pay down any debt, they'll close any deficit, and they'll be grateful to do it because america will be the greatest nation that it condition. don't constantly pound us with our grandchildren and our children. right now, today, america can afford to pay for what we are doing in the van hollen democratic budget becaus
understand and address that threat. we also have a national security higher education advisory board. we try to educate the leaders of these universities as to the threats that can occur at our target their research facilities. i would say probably has gotten exacerbated in the realm of digital information and cyber attacks. you no longer have to rely on an individual becoming your asset to gather the secrets in the cyber arena. it is just as easy to have somebody familiar with a cyberworld sitting in shanghai are beijing or some place in russia to attack the networks and export the information. a threat is more substantial than it was 10 or 15 years ago. >> i wrote to you about security lapses at the nasa centers. i saw that the fbi and dhs were involved in the apprehension of a credible individual being held. you have any comments about that case? >> i think it is indicative of the threat you mentioned. the arrest occurred over the weekend and is now in the court proceeding. >> if it was happening at nasa langley and i saw your testimony last week's with regard to clapper with regard to ch
, but look at nondefense discretionary spending. this is education. this is, all the kinds of programs that you're passionate about that are naturally and necessarily almost going to get squeezed as entitlement spending becomes larger and larger. >> they're going to get squeezed, again, if we look beyond, if we look past and we look to the year 2025, 2030, something has to give. we can't keep squeezing nondefense. nondefense discretionary, that's already pretty tight. and something will have to give. some combination of higher revenues find ways to save money on entitlements, but certainly ways to save money on entitlements. use the bargain power of medicare and all these things, fine. all of which is stuff that is worth talking about, but not a reason to not do deficit spending to support the economy now. >> the argument a would be, and this is the argument made by many do defense spending now and also put in term a long-term plan so that, "a" you assure the markets that you to have a plan. you're not hostage to fortune and case interest rates spike suddenly. you have a process in pla
% of mothers were feeding solid foods at a month and six months that went high as 90%. moms need to be educated when to know their child is ready. one of the ways you know your child tells you. heather: that is what you mentioned putting their hands in their mouth. >> and chewing. making motions that tell you they're ready to go. heather: you know moms that choose it use formula, it can get competent sensitive. -- expensive. another reason it is a economic factor to start child on solid food earlier. >> between four and six months the child is consuming a lot of formula. we need to find better ways for mom with difficulty, have not been educated who may not beable able to afford formula, get the formula at less expensive prices so they can be doing the right thing for their baby. >> the bottom line, it is a real danger to the baby to start them on solid food prior it six months? >> it it is significant risk on both sides in terms of development of the giving them something they can't digest and lack the enzymes and bacteria in their gut that allow them to consume the foods. we're also creating
mean weapons for the jordanians, and over the long term what it means is helping with the education of jordanian citizens. it means even my own view is a lot could be done in the intermediate term by american programs that would educate jordanian children so they learned english and so they could operate computers, so that they could use the internet. jenna: to engage on different levels throughout the generations of that country. "the washington post" has come out with an article today that questions whether or not the obama administration has a contingency plan two years into this conflict. the administration has been vague about what they want to do if a red line is crossed with chemical weapons or what the plan is moving forward. do you think that is because they don't want to release the plan to the public because it's classified or do you think they maybe don't have a plan? >> i hope it's because they don't want to release it to the public. i worry that they haven't formulated one. we always have to understand in the middle east, and i think it's taken the obama administratio
the department of education. he wants to stop aid to -- >> it's all over the place. that to me is the conservatives, not the common denominator of the party. what is the common denominator of the party i think is growth, opportunity, incomes, making us finally address this very serious debt, deficit. >> you're going to iowa. would you like to be a nominee of the republican party? >>> i've been to michigan, illinois, other places. i'm satisfied being governor of wisconsin. i had to do it twice to run for office. but both senators, they're somewhere in between. there's the prince. s that are timeless combined with the fact that we need to be more relevant as conservatives and republicans. what i mean by that, to your point, who in america grows up wanting to be dependent on government? who moves in from another country, comes in as an imgrant and doesn't want to live the american dream? we need to be the movement and the party that says we're the ones that have you not become dependent on government but empower you to live your treatment dream for more freedom and prosperity. >>
no sympathy for the brown v. board of education decision. when it was a crisis like little rock crisis, eisenhower did follow the law. he followed the constitution. he did what a five star general did. the hated this whole thing. anti-particularly didn't like adam clayton powell. he thought he was a demagogue. so i'm not sure what nixon's role in this, nixon was, you, nixon was very friendly with them because they kind of like each other. [inaudible] >> the issue was that he was actually influenced by advisers to him he won't be able to make a decisive decision not to include. so what i'm saying is that you feel as though nixon's personal politics towards african-americans during his administration were negatively affected by his advisors that surrounded him during that administration? >> i don't think the. you're talking presidents nixon, not vice president nixon spent but i'm talking about an event that happened during his vice presidential speeches are not aware of one or the other, i'm sorry. >> i think that richard nixon attitude towards african-americans were shaped by some assum
. we as a society have an obligation to do more to educate our young people about rape. they need to know it is a horrible crime of violence. it simply is not okay. >> and then there's the social media aspect of it all. prosecutors admitted that without those texts and those awful cell phone pictures they really didn't have much of a case. judge hatchet presided over one of the juvenile court systems in the country in atlanta before becoming a television judge and kathryn redmond is founder of the national coalition against violent athletes. judge hatchet, i thought of you immediately when i heard these verdicts and when i saw those kids and when i heard the reaction from the victim's mom and i wondered because this was so powerful and there was so much coverage on tv and social media, will this be the wake-up call that's needed for young people, many of whom you've seen come through your courtroom? >> absolutely. i presided over far too many cases like this. as i said last week, this really needs to be a teachable moment. i say that not just as a judge but as a parent that we nee
of law, economic development, education, and health. we consider these to be investments in a future palestinian state. investments in peace, which is in all of our interests. more broadly, in our discussions today i reaffirmed to president apass that the united states remains committed to realizing the vision of two states, which is in the interest of the palestinian people and also in the national security interest of israel, the united states and the world. we seek an independent, viable and contiguous palestinian state as the home land of the palestinian people, alongside the jewish state of israel, two nations enjoying self-determination, security, and peace. as i've said many times, the only way to achieve that goal is through direct negotiations between israelis and palestinians themselves. there is no short cut to a sustainable solution. in our discussion with president abbas, i heard him speak out about the difficult issues that cannot be ignored. among them, problems caused by continued settlement activity, the plight of palestinian prisoners, and access to holy sites in j
international. helping survivors of war and conflict. finance international providing financial education to children around the world. >> that's great. >> right out of the gates, we've got the nasdaq composite down by a little bit more than 1%. feeling the brunt of the losses early on in trading. >> isn't that funny? >> google was, frankly, was there a note last week that they didn't talk about, that google may have trouble making -- look, i'm just pointing out that there is an old -- new tech came under pressure last week at the same time that the western digitals and the sandesk. >> i can say something about google for a second? >> no. i'm sorry. 2 got zero play and nobody cared. i'm the only one that scared now it's ebay. >> and it came out with a big report that basically said in their testing, paid search which is 90% of google's revenue. >> yes. >> made no impact on click through rates or results. that basically free, just being out there with your meditags and everything else was just as good as paid search. it had all of these algorithms and i didn't understand half of it, but i
themselves, they want an education. and in many cases, the only way that they can get one is to have this tuition assistance program. i can recall being over in th the -- the mess halls in afghanistan and actually out in the field in afghanistan. we have some 200,000 army troops over there right now that are participating in this program. and it's not an expensive program. and so all we want to do is -- is to make sure that we give this -- what was taken out just -- of those individuals who are trying to better themselves, trying better them lives -- their lives and work for a career in the military. when you stop and think about the amount of money that could come out, if you just take some of the green initiatives, how many people know that our navy was forced to pay 450,000 gallons of fuel, pay $29 a gallon when you can buy them on the market for $3? all of these things. do we have any business having a biorefinery built by the federal government? these are all things that are in that budget. any one of them would be far more than the assistance that we are giving our troops in th
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